SL for Nowt

Living a digital life with empty pockets

The Basics – 02 – Inventory icons explained

UPDATE (June 1st 2010) – Scroll down to the bottom of this post for a quick visual of all the new icons being used in the new Second Life Viewer 2.

The Basics – 02 – Inventory icons explained

This post is one of a series aimed at newbies in Second Life. In the series, I hope to be able to answer all those questions that newbies have in-world and yet might not want to ask of anyone around them, for fear of appearing silly or noobish. There are no silly questions here; we all wondered these things when we first appeared in-world. *g*

This time we’re heading into the first of several posts about your inventory. This first post will explain the icons you’ll see in there, and the various items they are used for. All is not as obvious as it sometimes may seem!

Hop behind the cut to find out more.

Edit: Once again, WordPress ate the formatting of this post. *sigh* I think I’ve found a crafty workaround, though…

Before we begin, I use the old-style Second Life client, which has a dark grey interface. If you’re using the newer ‘Dazzle’ blue interface, these icons won’t be quite the same. But they’ll be similar enough that I hope you’ll recognise them. I don’t have Dazzle on my computer right now, but once it’s the main Second Life client, I’ll add secondary images alongside these ones, to show the newer icons.

I also hope to eventually link all of the sections in this post to relevant tutorials on the blog, so you’ll have a one-stop-shop guide.

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This is the main icon for all objects in Second Life, and it’s probably the most confusing icon, because it can mean many things. Its uses include:

– A boxed item that needs to be unpacked
– All non-clothing objects (such as furniture, plants, houses, vehicles, etc)
– Hair
– Shoes
– Accessories (such as jewellery, hats, sunglasses, etc)
– Extra pieces of clothing (such as cuffs, collars, belts, etc)
– Non-human avatar pieces (such as limbs)
– Eyes (very rarely, but I have seen this icon used for eyes before)
– HUDs (displays that you have on your screen, such as radar and animation overrides)
– Poseballs (items in-world that you sit on to put your avatar in poses or animations)
– Meters (items that you wear to show health/strength etc, in roleplay areas)

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This is the icon for a coalesced object. You probably won’t see too many of these, but if you do then they’ll probably be in your Lost & Found folder. Coalesced objects happen in places like sandboxes. Let’s say you’ve been to a sandbox and rezzed a house, a box of clothing, a car, and a tree. The sandbox is set to auto-return all items rezzed on it every three hours (for example). If you left your items there, then after three hours they would be returned to you all linked together in one coalesced object. If you drag this coalesced object back in-world, all of the items you had rezzed in the sandbox would appear in the exact same positions relative to each other that they were in when you left them at the sandbox.

A coalesced object can take on ANY of the names of the objects in contains. Given the example above, your coalesced object might be called ‘tree’, and you might wonder where your house, clothing box, and vehicle were. Well, they’re mixed in with the object called ‘tree’.

Think of a coalesced object like a .zip file; that’s the easiest way to get your head around it. Torley Linden has a great video tutorial on coalesced objects, which you can find here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3P1JOz1ARA

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Landmarks act like bookmarks to places in Second Life. Double-clicking them in your inventory will teleport you to that place (or, sometimes, to a landing point in the vicinity, after which you need to follow a red arrow toward the red beam that marks the actual landmark.

The shorthand for landmark in Second Life is ‘LM’, so if someone asks if you would like an LM to a new store, they’re offering you a landmark.

Landmarks can be either red or pink. There is no real difference between the two. I believe the only difference is that a pink landmark goes to a place where you have already been (eg: you went there and created the landmark yourself), whereas a red one goes to a place you have not yet been (eg: someone gave you the landmark).

To set a landmark when you’re at a place you might want to re-visit, go into the World menu and click Create Landmark Here.

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Notecards are useful for many reasons. You can use them to jot things down, to save roleplay logs, to store full-permissions items (and transfer them to other people), to keep a journal, etc etc. You will find them inside objects where they give you further info. They may be sent out to update groups you’re in, to tell you about offers and sales. You may be given one containing the rules of a roleplay area that you have teleported to.

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You’ll find many scripts in Second Life. They make things move, rotate, open and close. They are inside AOs (animation overriders), vehicles and weapons, jewellery and hair and clothes. They make sounds repeat, lights turn on and off when touched. Scripts in Second Life are written in Linden Scripting Language (LSL).

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Textures are what are applied to prims to decorate them. Everything from your hair to your clothes, your home to the ground you walk on, the advertising in stores to the funky hat you just bought: they’re all textured. You can buy textures in Second Life, or get free ones, or create and upload (at a cost of 10L$ per texture) your own.

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Snapshots are the photographs that you take within Second Life. You have three options when taking a snapshot: to upload it (where it will sit in your inventory), to send it as a postcard (to someone’s email address, for example) or to save it to your hard drive. Uploading snapshots costs 10L$ per snapshot; saving to hard drive and sending postcards cost nothing.

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Simply, this is a sound file that can either be played by double-clicking it in your inventory, or by placing it in an object, together with a script that will make it play (once, looped, or mixed with other sounds in the object). You can upload your own sounds (at a cost of 10L$ per sound) but they must be less than 10s in length and in the preferred format. See the SL Wiki for further information:

http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/Sound_Clips

Torley Linden has a video tutorial on making and uploading sound clips:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBVmFafFatE

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An animation is just that: a physical series of poses (sometimes just a single pose: in which case it is usually marketed as a ‘pose’ rather than an ‘animation’) that your avatar will go through when the animation is double-clicked in inventory and either ‘play inworld’ (everyone will see you perform the animation) or ‘play locally’ (only you will see the animation) is clicked. Animations are placed into AOs (animation overriders) for avatars to wear. AOs give avatars realistic sets of stand, sit, walk, etc poses.

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A gesture is a mixure of sound and animation that, when the keyword is typed in chat (eg: for a gesture called /laugh when you type /laugh you will hear the sound of laughter), your avatar will perform. Gestures must be activated (right-click and select ‘activate’) before they can be used in-world. For more about gestures, check out Torley Linden’s video:

How to use gestures – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WKo4G8aQBc

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The shape icon denotes a saved set of measurements to create an avatar shape in Second Life. Right-clicking and wearing a shape will change your avatar’s shape to that selected shape. You cannot take off a shape: instead you have to replace it with another shape.

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The skin icon denotes the covering of your avatar’s shape: its skin. The skin is like an opaque tattoo that goes over the default avatar skin, making it look totally different. You cannot take off a skin: instead you have to replace it with another skin.

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This icon denotes the grown hair that is present on the default avatars in Second Life. Grown hair is the hair that looks blocky and as though it’s glued onto your head. It’s edited with the hair sliders when you enter the Edit Appearance menu. Most people in Second Life choose to wear prim hair instead of the grown hair, so you are most likely to encounter this icon as a ‘bald base’ (ie: the grown hair with settings down to zero) because any grown hair left on the head will show through prim hair. If you are wearing prim hair, you must wear a bald base beneath it, and all hair-makers in Second Life will offer a bald base in their hair packs.

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This icon denotes avatar eyes. You can create new eyes using the sliders in the Edit Appearance window, tinting them using the colour palette, or you can buy/create your own eyes by applying an eye texture to the texture area in the same window.

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This is the icon for simple shoes in Second Life: the ones that appear to be drawn onto the foot of the avatar. The default flipflops on the old newbie avatars were simple shoes such as these. Most people in Second Life choose to wear prim shoes, so you are most likely to encounter this icon as a ‘foot shaper’ that must be worn beneath prim shoes. Foot shapers will contort your avatar’s feet to fit inside the shoes. (Incidentally, womens’ shoes in second Life are generally made to fit foot size zero, and the average mens’ shoe size accomodates a foot size of up to 14. These can be adjusted with the sliders in the ‘legs’ section of the Edit Appearance window.)

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This icon denotes any item of clothing or body markings such as tattoos (and occasionally jewellery items) that are created to be worn on the upper underwear layer, including torso underwear (bra, etc) itself. It is the bottom layer in the three layers of torso clothing, and will be worn under the two other layers: shirt and jacket.

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This icon denotes any item of clothing or body markings such as tattoos (and occasionally jewellery items) that are created to be worn on the shirt layer, including (but not limited to) t-shirts (usually tucked-in versions), tank tops, vests, shirts, etc. It is the middle layer in the three layers of torso clothing, and will be worn over anything on the undershirt layer, but under anything on the jacket layer.

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This icon denotes any item of clothing or body markings such as tattoos (and occasionally jewellery items) that are created to be worn on the jacket layer, including (but not limited to) t-shirts, tank tops, vests, shirts (all usually untucked versions) and jackets. It is the top layer in the three layers of torso clothing and will be worn over anything on the two lower layers: undershirt and shirt.

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This icon denotes any item of clothing or body markings such as tattoos that are created to be worn on the lower underwear layer, including lower underwear (briefs, panties, etc) itself. It is the bottom layer of the two layers of lower clothing and will be worn beneath anything on the pants layer.

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This icon denotes any item of clothing or body markings such as tattoos that are created to be worn on the pants layer. It is the top layer of the two layers of lower clothing and will be worn above anything on the underpants layer.

A note about clothing layers: Many clothing creators will offer their items on more than one layer, allowing you to mix and match, and to choose whether to wear a (shirt layer) tucked-in t-shirt beneath a jacket, or a (jacket layer) untucked shirt on its own. Pants may also be offered on both underwear and pants layer: the underwear layer is usually skin-tight, to allow the pants to be worn tucked into boots, whereas the pants layer consists of standard pants with flared bottoms.

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This icon denotes what is called ‘the system skirt’ which is often used as a base skirt over which flexible prim layers are worn to create a more realistic flowing skirt. The system skirt can be worn on its own, and created at any length from mini to maxi.

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This icon denotes any item of clothing or body markings such as tattoos that are worn on the lower-to-mid leg and foot area, including (but not limited to) socks, stockings and nail polish/manicures. If you notice that, when wearing pants, the inside of the pants’ base area (where the cuff meets your ankle) is flesh-coloured, a pair of socks will help to colour that area. Many shoe shapers consist of a sock-like colouring that will solve this problem for you when you wear shoes.

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This icon denotes any item of clothing or body markings such as tattoos that are worn on the lower arm and hand area, including (but not limited to) gloves, nail polish/manicures and jewellery.

That is a brief overview of the inventory icons. I hope it proves useful to you. I will be making several more posts about the inventory, so stay tuned. In the meantime, if you have any questions about this post, please don’t hesitate to comment here and I will do my best to answer them.

UPDATE: Viewer 2 icons

July 16, 2008 - Posted by | hints and tips, newbies, second life, sl basics |

2 Comments »

  1. […] tried bringing the house into the Open Sim inventory. In SL I save the house as a coalesced object. I select all 295 objects that make up the house and do a ‘take’. Right now there are […]

    Pingback by MeerKat Viewer Review « Nalates’ Things & Stuff Blog | June 20, 2009 | Reply

  2. […] The Basics – 02 – Inventory icons explained […]

    Pingback by Inventory Management 101 « SL for Nowt « Ashes To Ashes, Sale To Sale | July 15, 2009 | Reply


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